How to Include Aesthetics to Increase Revenue/Part 3 of 3

In our last article, we discussed how a primary care physician entering the aesthetic marketplace uses tactics such as demographics for location, competition, patient selection, financing and advertising. In this article we will examine the hiring, educational and training process of your new product line - as it is quite different than primary care medicine. HIRINGJust as the aesthetic patient is quite different than your primary care patient, employees in the aesthetic market are quite different than primary care employees. Patients want to be treated by staff members who they feel are knowledgeable in the services they want. How do you find that right mix of personnel to "WOW" the aesthetic patient? In addition to your existing personnel who will be working with your primary care patients, try to find additional candidates who are already in the aesthetic/cosmetic industry. It is much more difficult to train an inexperienced employee in the aesthetic field because it is quite industry specific. The...

Read More

Light Therapy for Skin Disease

Understanding PhototherapyPhototherapy is the use of selected wavelengths of light to treat disease. In its most modern version, Narrowband UVB, it is an effective, safe, and patient preferred therapy, whether delivered in a physician's office or in the patient's home. Starting with the 1903 Nobel Prize winning work of Niels Finsen, phototherapy has evolved to precisely target the most therapeutically useful wavelengths and to avoid unnecessary exposure to unproductive portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Common Treated DiseasesThe most commonly treated photoresponsive diseases are psoriasis, vitiligo and eczema. In psoriasis, a patient will require a course of 20-30 treatments over the course of about a month to clear their skin. Typically, the patient's skin will then remain clear for a period of months before needing another course of therapy. Treatment RegimenThe treatment regimen consists of gradually increased doses of ultraviolet delivered to the patient' skin. The doses are measured in...

Read More

How to Include Aesthetics to Increase Revenue/Part 2 of 3

In our last article, we introduced how primary care physicians can get started in the aesthetic market. This included the transition from taking that initial leap to deciding which services to bring into your new venture. If you missed our introductory article, you can still view it at articles.physiciansofficeresource.com. In this article we will discuss other key factors to consider when brining aesthetic services in to your office, such as obtaining the best location, understanding your competition, getting the most out of your financing, and marketing to new and existing patients. Establishing a Location and Assessing the Competition You may have determined which age bracket and procedures you want to perform, but one of the most important aspects now becomes location, location, location. Consider the socioeconomic class of your current and prospective patients; you must remember your new product lines are not insurance-based, but rather fee-for-service out of the patient's disposable income. You w...

Read More

How to Include Aesthetics to Increase Revenue/ Part 1 of 3

PART 1 OF 3 Over the past five years, we have seen an influx of various medical specialists entering into the aesthetic/cosmetic market. The main reasons for this are the reduction in insurance reimbursement and the increased popularity of non-surgical treatments for both genders. With that, how do you introduce the concept into your new, current or even future direction of your existing primary care practice?  Taking the LeapIf you work in a group, introducing the concept of aesthetics in a primary care practice is the most difficult, due to the nature of changing the culture of your colleagues or partners. It is not impossible, but it may take more time to be successful, as the shift of the paradigm isn't always easy. Some of the dilemmas you will face including convincing the practice to advertise to a different audience, utilize media and internet marketing, and attend aesthetic conferences to learn about new products and services that will make you successful. In addition, there is a major ra...

Read More

Self Healing Synthetic Skin Holds Medical and Commercial Promise

Nary an engineering model exists like that of human skin, which makes it all the more difficult for researchers to replicate it. Skin is sensitive enough to send the brain precise information about pressure and temperature, but it can also heal efficiently enough to create a protective forcefield against the outside elements. The combination of these two features in a single synthetic material has presented an exciting challenge for Stanford Chemical Engineering Professor Zhenan Bao and her team. Now, they've successfully created the first material that can sense subtle pressures and heal itself when torn or cut. Their findings will be published on November 11 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The last decade has shown us major advances in synthetic skin, but even the most effective self-healing materials presented major drawbacks. Some needed to be exposed to high temperatures, rendering them impractical for day-to-day use. Others could heal effectively at room temperature, but repairing a cut...

Read More

Needle Free Injection Patch, Powered by Fermentation

Purdue researchers have created a tiny pump entirely powered by fermentation. The discovery may one day be used to power transdermal drug patches that can deliver drugs and medication from an internal reservoir in a controlled way. The pump's reservoir houses a mixture of sugar and yeast, which when combined with a trace amount of water, and when slightly heated by the patient's own body, generate carbon dioxide. The build up of CO2 creates pressure within, and this provides energy for a squeezing a drug sack positions on top of the fermentation chamber. The "microorganism-powered thermopneumatic pump" is constructed of layers of a rubber-likepolymer, called polydimethylsiloxane, which is manufactured commercially for diaphragms in pumps. The prototype measures 1.5 centimeters long. Current "transdermal" patches are limited and can only deliver drugs, (like nicotine) and utilize small hydophobic molecules that can be absorbed through the skin. "Many drugs, including those for treating cancer and...

Read More

Pain Free Injections... With Lasers

One of the least favored staples of medical care, but one of the most common, needle injections have been used to deliver medicine to children and adults. Still, various techniques have been implemented in hopes of providing more pain-free alternatives. A laser-based system, however, one that blasts microscopic streams of drugs into the skin could soon make receiving a shot as painless as routine as a hit with a short blast of air. Using and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, or Er:YAG, laser to shoot a highly concentrated stream of medicine with just the right level of force. This type of laser has been commonly used by dermatologists "particularly for facial esthetic treatments," says Jack Yoh, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Seoul National University in South Korea, who developed the device along with his graduate students. Yoh and his team describe the injector in a paper published in the Optical Society's (OSA) journal Optics Letters. The laser is comb...

Read More