There is a direct connection between inefficiency and burnout

Mark Linzer’s research identified workplace chaos as one of the key predictors of physician stress, burnout, and intention to leave. A recent analysis of the data showed that physicians in clinics with chaotic work environments had significantly more stress and burnout and a higher likelihood of leaving the practice within two years. These clinics also had significantly more missed opportunities to provide preventative services and had significantly higher rates of medical errors.

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The Online Review - A Mostly True Account of a Millennial Patient

There’d been an ugly cyst on my elbow since high school. It was small, maybe the size of a No. 2 pencil eraser and though unsightly, totally benign. It was the kind of thing a few specialists had looked at, and barring its grotesque nature, "shouldn’t be a significant problem." And for years it honestly wasn’t. There was a moment when I turned the corner though, and if I’m being honest with myself it was probably the 5th morning I woke up with bloody sheets. OK, it sounds worse than it was but without any context, I wasn't sure how many more times I could leave my bedroom looking like that scene from Reservoir Dogs before scooting off to work. I'd knock my elbow against the wall in the middle of the night, break the cyst and bam. Terrible morning. Sounds insane right? I can't make this stuff up.

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White Coats - Function, Fashion or Neither?

Way back in antiquity, physicians wore black to denote their profession. Their garb was a visual cue for laymen and carried prominent cultural signifiers of importance and distinction. Over time, the traditional black attire shifted to white, symbolizing purity, cleanliness, and the (then) novel concept that medicine was to be treated as one of the sciences. We still use the white coat as a visual symbol for the physician, an essential ingredient of the uniform we’ve come to expect. For many medical students, a prestigious, calf-length white coat will be a confirmation of a long and arduous achievement; a wearable rite of passage.

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